California Illegally Sterilizes Female Inmates:

An investigation of the California prison system revealed troubling numbers of female inmates who had been sterilized without their consent, in addition to many other breaches of protocol.

A report released on Thursday by the California State Auditor examined 144 cases of tubal ligations (more commonly referred to as having one’s “tubes tied”) performed on imprisoned women over the course of eight years.

“Some of the inmates were sterilized unlawfully, and there were certain safeguards that were designed to limit those occurrences, and those failed,” Margarita Fernández, the auditor’s chief of public affairs, tells TIME.

Among the 144 cases, 39 sterilizations were performed without the inmate’s lawful consent. In another 27 cases, the inmate’s physician did not sign the form that confirmed two key components of consent: first, that the patient was mentally competent and understood the lasting effects of the procedure, and second, that the required waiting period had been satisfied.

Odd that they’re calling in the “Medical Board of California” to investigate this rather than, y’know, the FBI with the possibility of seeking criminal indictments against those responsible.

Well, they’re just a bunch of women criminals, right? Who cares?

In other “Orange is the new Dead” news, this past week saw three executions, one here in Georgia, within a 24 hour span.

When Florida followed through with the execution of John Ruthell Henry Wednesday evening, it brought the tally of state executions in the last 24 hours up to three, a change of pace since a botched lethal injection in Oklahoma on April 29 caused a de facto pause on the death penalty due to national jitters over the humaneness of the drugs used in the procedure.

This recent spate of executions comes just months after Oklahoma botched the lethal injection of inmate Clayton Lockett, who had a heart attack and whose physical movements indicated pain for 25 minutes after being administered the lethal injection. In the wake of that execution, a number of appeals have been granted to prisoners seeking to avoid a similar fate.

Lawyers for Marcus Wellons, executed on Tuesday evening in Georgia, and John Winfield, executed Wednesday afternoon in Missouri, used similar arguments in their appeals, but were rejected.

Apparently, there were no incidences of writhing around in agony on the gurney, that we’re aware of anyway. Some reports say it took more than an hour to get Wellons dead in the Georgia execution in Jackson, and that a witness passed out.

Wellons was executed at the Georgia Diagnostic and Classification Prison in Jackson, located about 45 minutes south of Atlanta.

His execution was first reported by Alan Blinder of the New York Times. None of the media witnesses reported seeing anything unusual, other than a guard fainting. While an official initially told reporters that the execution took more than an hour, witnesses said later that it didn’t take nearly that long.

Georgia used to carry out lethal injections using a three-drug combination, but the state changed its execution protocol in July 2012. Now executions are carried out using only the drug pentobarbital, which had previously been one of the three drugs Georgia used in executions.

Pet tested, Vet approved, baby.

I suppose it’s a brief but momentary victory for the pro-death penalty bloggers out there. Key word being “momentary.”

BTW, if you read that blog, support for the death penalty, when given LWOP as an option, has been well below 50% for decades. It’s nowhere near “60% for the fortieth straight year” or whatever drivel is noted there.

Cross Posted From: The Power Elite

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